If you’ve been in the job market for more than…a minute, you’re probably imagining – no fantasizing – about getting that job offer. You can see yourself saying yes, and leaving the job hunt behind. But what about when it isn’t right? Do you know when to turn down a job offer? Yes, really, these times exist. And they can be hard to see in the moment. turn down a job

Five times you should turn down a job offer:

Even in the best of jobs – fulfilling work, great pay, interesting colleagues – it’s often difficult to not occasionally get pulled into the petty underbelly of work, no matter how hard you try to avoid office politics. It’s usually close to impossible to completely stay out of the way – people are people and there are always a handful (or more) who want to manipulate situations to their advantage. avoid office politics

Here are some ways to avoid office politics:

You got a new job! Awesome. Congratulations. Or, an offer for a new job, anyway. Still great, but if you haven’t accepted yet, you want to be sure to negotiate a job offer. And it’s not all about money (although, hey, that’s part of it.) negotiate a job offer

Here are tips to negotiate a job offer.

If you’re in the job market, then you’re almost certainly on LinkedIn and active on online job boards. You hopefully also have a polished, professional resume. A great resume is important, but you can be even more creative with an online resume – a personal website, of sorts, but very streamlined to just your professional profile. build an online resume

Here’s how to build an online resume:

Whenever you find yourself in the market for a new job, you’ll likely get all kinds of advice. Some of which is more useful than others, as everyone has a different opinion on what’s the most difficult thing about finding your next position. But one thing people don’t consider is age. If you’re an older job seeker – especially over 50 – you could find that you have unique challenges.

tips for the older job seeker

Things to consider if you’re an older job seeker:

We mentioned previously that one challenge with feeling as if you hate your job is that as Americans, we average fewer vacation days than many countries, in for example, Western Europe. But the truth is, even if you love your job, you must take vacation days. In fact, if you’re unhappy you might actually take advantage of some days away. The danger in being driven and satisfied at work is not knowing when to step back. why you must take vacation (1)

You must take vacation – and here’s why.

Americans work long hours. Longer than a lot of other major economies (pretty much all of Europe, to start with). The average full time worker is at the office 47 hours per week. We also receive, on average 15 days of vacation – and take just 14 of them. (The average European worker gets 28 days. Yes, really.) So, if you hate your job, that’s a lot of time to be unhappy. If leaving immediately isn’t an option – and for most people it isn’t, here are some ways to make the work day more bearable. hate your job

Ways to cope when you hate your job:

Most people in sales know, whether you’re a one-person shop or a multinational, it’s often easier to keep a current client than to get a new one. But what if you’re a service provider and a few clients are slowly using you less and less? Or they disappear for months, only to pop up again? You could consider offering clients monthly retainer arrangements. If you haven’t quite lost them, but they’re not coming to you as much as you like, this might be a solution. monthly retainer arrangements

Things to consider about monthly retainer arrangements:

If you’re the boss, then technically you might not need to be an effective speaker. People sort of have to listen to you, right? Maybe. But if you know how to communicate like a leader, then you won’t have to rely on seniority (or, fear). You want a team that both understands what you need and enjoys hearing how you say it. communicate like a leader

Three ways to communicate like a leader:

If you’re in the market for a new job, you already know the importance of having an updated resume and sparkling LinkedIn profile. Obviously you want to make sure that you have all your most recent experience, new technical skills, and changes in basic information. But what’s a skill and what’s a cliché? We look at a few skills to delete from your resume (and LinkedIn) and replace with something more savvy. skills to delete from your resume

Here are skills to delete from your resume – today: