Job Seekers

You’ve got the new job. Congratulations. But how do you become a great new employee? After all, you’ve already been a great recruit. You’ve put together the great resume, or LinkedIn profile. You made it through one interview, or several. You negotiated salary. You moved across country, or started a new commute. But – now you’re the new guy (or woman) at the office. How do you start to become more than just the unknown face? great new employee

How to be a great new employee:

Whether you have been in the market for five minutes or five decades, you're constantly sifting through what's important to remember in future decisions, and what's additional noise. The truth is, everybody has an opinion. Everybody has advice. Not everybody is right. They can't all be. And what's important information to you, will be useless to someone else. But we offer some pearls of wisdom that resonated with us, and we pass them on to you here. It's up to you to embrace them or discard them.

 career advice

Here's some career advice to consider:

If you’re headed to college, already there, or thinking about going back, you’ve probably been considering what to major in. While there are some obvious decisions to make about what you find interesting and what you have a natural strength in, there’s also the reality of how much money you’re likely to make. But before you run to the cash, consider also what is most fulfilling. There are multiple studies that the highest-paying professions are not always the ones that bring the greatest happiness. On the other hand, those with satisfying work responsibilities tend to be less stressed, feel more productive and experience less burnout.

highly satisfying careers

It’s the conversation that everyone dreads. You’ve been called into your boss’ office, or human resources. Your position is being eliminated. There is restructuring going on and the department is being merged. The company is being sold. Whatever the circumstances, you’re being laid off. There’s always a rush of emotions, from anger to panic to sadness, but it’s important not to react in the moment.

things to do when you are laid off

Things to do when you are laid off:

As we have stated before, resumes are used far less than in the past. This means it's becoming a bit of a dying art, and people are becoming less adept at knowing the things that should be on every resume. With the advent of social media, especially LinkedIn, more and more job seekers and employers are turning to online platforms. Employers post jobs on LinkedIn, and recruiters search for strong candidates there, who in turn have (hopefully) robust profiles about themselves. However, that does not mean it’s wise to not have any resume at all. Things that should be on every resume

Here are things that should be on every resume.

It wasn’t uncommon thirty or even twenty years ago for young people to find a job with a company, and then spend the better part of their career continuing to scale up the ranks of management, and eventually retire from their first employer ever. While some of those career paths might have led to positions in a variety of cities, it was just as likely that they would stay in the same town for their whole career, especially if they worked at the corporate headquarters or a major office. People might never move for a job. Fast forward to the last ten years, and recent statistics state that it’s normal to have ten different jobs before the age of 40. Given all those different opportunities and experiences it’s a lot more typical to find yourself not just switching letterhead, but switching zip codes. But that’s not necessarily an easy decision. Moving for a job

How to do you decide if you should be moving for a job?

It’s time for New Year’s resolutions. Well, maybe – if you’re into that sort of thing. Even if you’re not, you could just coincidentally start thinking about practicing the habits of successful professionals, right as the beginning of the year starts? So whether you’re the type who vows to be a whole new person by January 1 or doesn’t believe in changing overnight because of the calendar, here are some tips on how to put your best foot forward at the office. Habits of successful professionals

Here are some popular habits of successful professionals:

Whether you are in final discussions with an employer about a new job, or decades into your current position, it’s important to make sure that you are getting paid what you’re worth. These conversations about negotiating salary are rarely easy, but at least you can make sure they are effective and professional.

negotiating salary

Here are 5 tips for negotiating salary:

The economy is still in recovery. You have a job, and it pays ok, the commute isn’t too bad and the benefits are fine. But. You’re bored, or even miserable. You feel you’ve done everything in your job three times before. You don’t feel stimulated. You may start wondering, "Is it time to quit?" Is it them or is it you? Maybe it doesn’t even matter. If you find yourself increasingly dissatisfied at work, it might be time to make a change in your career. Time to Quit

Here are five signs it’s time to quit:

So you like your job, you feel that you are a very good employee, and you have been in the position for a while. Now you’re looking for the next opportunity – preferably upward. So how do you get a promotion to a new role? There are a lot of ways to skin a cat; you have to navigate the people and politics of your organization. But there are some steps you can take – and pitfalls to avoid – that are likely to get you noticed and move a rung up the ladder. tips to get promoted

Things you can do (and avoid) to get promoted: