Small Business Owners

Americans work long hours. Longer than a lot of other major economies (pretty much all of Europe, to start with). The average full time worker is at the office 47 hours per week. We also receive, on average 15 days of vacation – and take just 14 of them. (The average European worker gets 28 days. Yes, really.) So, if you hate your job, that’s a lot of time to be unhappy. If leaving immediately isn’t an option – and for most people it isn’t, here are some ways to make the work day more bearable. hate your job

Ways to cope when you hate your job:

Most people in sales know, whether you’re a one-person shop or a multinational, it’s often easier to keep a current client than to get a new one. But what if you’re a service provider and a few clients are slowly using you less and less? Or they disappear for months, only to pop up again? You could consider offering clients monthly retainer arrangements. If you haven’t quite lost them, but they’re not coming to you as much as you like, this might be a solution. monthly retainer arrangements

Things to consider about monthly retainer arrangements:

If you’re the boss, then technically you might not need to be an effective speaker. People sort of have to listen to you, right? Maybe. But if you know how to communicate like a leader, then you won’t have to rely on seniority (or, fear). You want a team that both understands what you need and enjoys hearing how you say it. communicate like a leader

Three ways to communicate like a leader:

Whether you’ve had your business for years or just finished the first one, a new year offers a natural time to assess where you are and where you want to be. Annual checks for businesses aren’t meant to replace the more frequent monitoring of your business. Regular activity like sales targets and budgets should be happening monthly, if not more often. But a few tasks just need a once a year check-in to make sure you don’t need to make any adjustments. annual checks for businesses

Here are some annual checks for businesses to consider soon:

Whether you’ve started your own company, or been hired to run someone else’s, being the boss is exciting. After all it’s a statement that you have the ability and confidence to be the last word on all things. No matter where you are in your career, there is a satisfying sense of accomplishment. And no one tells you what to do…sort of. So it might be surprising as you settle into the role and discover all is not as you expected. being the boss

Here are some surprising things about being the boss:

Like clockwork, the commercials and emails and online ads for the holidays arrived just as turkeys landed on tables across the country. We’re officially in the holiday season, and there’s no turning back until January 2. For some, this is the most special part of the year, getting ready to spend time with family, decorate the house and indulge in seasonal savories. And it can be easy to survive the holiday season at work if that’s how you see it. But taking all that jolly spirit to the office can be tricky for some. holiday season at work

Here’s how to handle the holiday season at work:

So, you might be sick of the idea of older and wiser. Or, “you’ll understand when you’re older”. Or. . .well, fill in your favorite “experience matters” cliché. But. Well, the truth is, more experienced workers can be a really valuable asset to your team. So consider why you should hire older workers to help grow your business. hire older workers

Reasons why you might want to hire older workers:

In our post on being a seasonal worker during the holidays, we made a strong argument for why now is a good time to start considering seasonal work if you are in the job market (or not, but open to some extra cash). And if you’re on the other side of the hiring desk? Here’s how to hire seasonal workers for the holidays and still keep the happy in your happy holidays. hire seasonal workers for holidays

Tips if You Plan to Hire Seasonal Workers for the Holidays