Job Seekers

The process of finding a new job is never easy. But let's say you've done all the right things -- you've kept your LinkedIn profile current, been dutifully participating in networking opportunities and got the letters of reference in your back pocket. And now you've locked down an interview. Great work -- but are you ready? Interviewers can be tough, but the questions don't have to become stumpers. We discuss some common interview questions that can get you dinged or distinguished.
Tough Interview Questions

Here are five hard interview questions to prepare for:

Even the best of jobs can from time to time prove to be stressful. Before we know it, we can find that we’re dreading each morning, and exhausted by noon. So, how then, do we keep a balance of meeting the demands of work without succumbing to the stress that often accompanies it? 5 Ways to Reduce Stress at Work

Here are five tips to reduce stress at work:

If you are out in the job market, or even thinking about getting out into the job market, you will certainly need an updated resume, LinkedIn profile or CV to help promote yourself to potential employers. And of course, it is key that it be free of spelling errors, have up to date contact information and use good grammar. That's the basics, however, and it will take more than that if you want to your application to be the one they notice. So how do you make sure that you emphasize the right skill sets and experiences to get a company's attention? Everyone wants to describe themselves as “effective” and “organized”. But the truth is, that doesn’t really mean anything if your resume doesn’t give some context to these adjectives. You are going to have to be more specific and give concrete evidence of your talent if you want to really leave an impact.

The days of the mailed paper resume are long, long gone. But even the emailed variety is dying a slow death. Sure, interested employers still ask for a traditional CV once you are at the interview stage, but finding a job by sending out a cover letter and resume to dozens of companies is pretty old school. 93% of companies now use LinkedIn for recruiting purposes -- for not only searching for candidates, but also for publishing opportunities. In other words, get thee to a computer and polish your profile. linked in profile tips

Most people have a pretty good idea of what it takes to be a good team member of an organization. It’s about more than just what you contribute, but how you support your boss, your colleagues, even the greater mission of the company. Understanding the long-term goals and the core values of your employer help show that you are engaged and committed to the long term view. But what if you’re not in a role with a permanent commitment? What if you found a position with a staffing agency, and it’s only supposed to last six months, or even six weeks? Can you really make an impression? Yep. You really can – but you do have to adjust your expectations and how you make your contributions. be a great temp

Whether you are actively in the job market, or even just considering a new opportunity, you have probably started thinking about the interview process (and if you haven’t, you should be). If you have a staffing agency interview, you should consider what might be different from a traditional job interview. No matter how impressive your credentials and how solid your recommendations; you almost certainly will have to convince a potential employer that you’re the right candidate during an interview. Interviews give your future boss all kinds of information about you: are you prompt? Courteous? Professional? Eloquent? Engaging? And that’s not even about the substance of the interview – what your actual experience and skill sets are and how they align with what the company is looking for. A lot of the tips for interviewing for a traditional job are applicable to a temp position as well. But you might want to modify your answers and be prepared for a few questions that are specific to short term employment when you are prepping for a staffing agency interview.

Interview with Staffing Agency

This year 46% of companies plan to use temporary employees at some point in 2015. While many of them may truly only need short-term help for a spike in business (such as accounting firms during tax season), using a temp can also be a great way to assess a temp-to-perm opportunity – turning a seasonal or periodic worker into a long-term member of the team. But how do you assess a potential new hire that is working for you through a staffing agency?

Hire Using temp-to-perm

It’s the new economy, as you’ve probably heard. One of the most important things you can do if you’re a job seeker is to research, network and keep your eyes and ears open for new opportunities. And these days, more and more people (actually, about three million!) are using temp firms or staffing agencies to help them find jobs, whether short term or permanent.

We’re all accustomed to trial periods for software programs, 30-day return policies for appliances, and easy refunds for clothes we return. But what about new employees? It’s hard to imagine parting ways with a recent hire after a few short weeks, even if you’re sure it isn’t working out well. Not only can it be legally tough – in some states you can quickly incur financial obligations if you terminate even relatively short-lived employees, it’s also a painful, and just plain awkward conversation to have.