Job Seekers

So you’ve decided, as the old song says, “you can take this job and shove it”? Too many hours? Not enough dollars? Awful commute? Bored out of your mind? There are lots of good reasons for why you want to leave your job. But you should know them and understand them. If you don’t. . .maybe wait until you do. want to leave your job

If you want to leave your job, make sure you know why.

Whether you’re actively in the market for a new job, or just casually pondering looking for a new opportunity, you should consider doing informational interviews. The benefits are more significant than apparent, and they are great preparation for interviews for an actual position.

informational interviews

Here are some reasons to consider informational interviews:

If you’ve been in the job market for more than…a minute, you’re probably imagining – no fantasizing – about getting that job offer. You can see yourself saying yes, and leaving the job hunt behind. But what about when it isn’t right? Do you know when to turn down a job offer? Yes, really, these times exist. And they can be hard to see in the moment. turn down a job

Five times you should turn down a job offer:

You got a new job! Awesome. Congratulations. Or, an offer for a new job, anyway. Still great, but if you haven’t accepted yet, you want to be sure to negotiate a job offer. And it’s not all about money (although, hey, that’s part of it.) negotiate a job offer

Here are tips to negotiate a job offer.

If you’re in the job market, then you’re almost certainly on LinkedIn and active on online job boards. You hopefully also have a polished, professional resume. A great resume is important, but you can be even more creative with an online resume – a personal website, of sorts, but very streamlined to just your professional profile. build an online resume

Here’s how to build an online resume:

Whenever you find yourself in the market for a new job, you’ll likely get all kinds of advice. Some of which is more useful than others, as everyone has a different opinion on what’s the most difficult thing about finding your next position. But one thing people don’t consider is age. If you’re an older job seeker – especially over 50 – you could find that you have unique challenges.

tips for the older job seeker

Things to consider if you’re an older job seeker:

If you’re in the market for a new job, you already know the importance of having an updated resume and sparkling LinkedIn profile. Obviously you want to make sure that you have all your most recent experience, new technical skills, and changes in basic information. But what’s a skill and what’s a cliché? We look at a few skills to delete from your resume (and LinkedIn) and replace with something more savvy. skills to delete from your resume

Here are skills to delete from your resume – today:

It’s everyone’s favorite time of year to promise to stop doing all the things they do now, and start doing all the stuff they don’t. In other words, become entirely new people to coincide with a calendar. How about taking on a few tasks that are not too overwhelming, but could help you become a happier employee? Whether you’re looking for a new job, or just a newfound enthusiasm for your current one, these ideas are way easier than giving up gluten or running a marathon. become a happier employee

Here are some resolutions that could help you become a happier employee:

It’s a common belief that hiring slows, or even stops, during the holiday season. As a result, many of those who have been dutifully networking, applying and interviewing, shelve their efforts to resume in the new year. Job hunting during the holidays might seem like a waste of time. It’s not – maybe Santa can’t gift wrap a new opportunity, but that doesn’t mean you should stop looking. job hunting during the holidays

Things to consider when job hunting during the holidays:

When you’re in college, or just a young person generally, it sometimes seems like getting a mentor is unnecessary. There are so many people who naturally can help steer your path: parents, professors, school counselors. So recognizing the value of mentorship is buried in the benefits you reap through a community of informal advisers. But once you are out pursuing a career, you may slowly realize that your parents don’t have experience directly relevant to your profession, and your university umbrella of support begins to fade into the past. getting a mentor

Here’s why you should consider getting a mentor: