Job Seekers

It’s the conversation that everyone dreads. You’ve been called into your boss’ office, or human resources. Your position is being eliminated. There is restructuring going on and the department is being merged. The company is being sold. Whatever the circumstances, you’re being laid off. There’s always a rush of emotions, from anger to panic to sadness, but it’s important not to react in the moment.

things to do when you are laid off

Things to do when you are laid off:

As we have stated before, resumes are used far less than in the past. This means it's becoming a bit of a dying art, and people are becoming less adept at knowing the things that should be on every resume. With the advent of social media, especially LinkedIn, more and more job seekers and employers are turning to online platforms. Employers post jobs on LinkedIn, and recruiters search for strong candidates there, who in turn have (hopefully) robust profiles about themselves. However, that does not mean it’s wise to not have any resume at all. Things that should be on every resume

Here are things that should be on every resume.

It wasn’t uncommon thirty or even twenty years ago for young people to find a job with a company, and then spend the better part of their career continuing to scale up the ranks of management, and eventually retire from their first employer ever. While some of those career paths might have led to positions in a variety of cities, it was just as likely that they would stay in the same town for their whole career, especially if they worked at the corporate headquarters or a major office. People might never move for a job. Fast forward to the last ten years, and recent statistics state that it’s normal to have ten different jobs before the age of 40. Given all those different opportunities and experiences it’s a lot more typical to find yourself not just switching letterhead, but switching zip codes. But that’s not necessarily an easy decision. Moving for a job

How to do you decide if you should be moving for a job?

It’s time for New Year’s resolutions. Well, maybe – if you’re into that sort of thing. Even if you’re not, you could just coincidentally start thinking about practicing the habits of successful professionals, right as the beginning of the year starts? So whether you’re the type who vows to be a whole new person by January 1 or doesn’t believe in changing overnight because of the calendar, here are some tips on how to put your best foot forward at the office. Habits of successful professionals

Here are some popular habits of successful professionals:

Whether you are in final discussions with an employer about a new job, or decades into your current position, it’s important to make sure that you are getting paid what you’re worth. These conversations about negotiating salary are rarely easy, but at least you can make sure they are effective and professional.

negotiating salary

Here are 5 tips for negotiating salary:

The economy is still in recovery. You have a job, and it pays ok, the commute isn’t too bad and the benefits are fine. But. You’re bored, or even miserable. You feel you’ve done everything in your job three times before. You don’t feel stimulated. You may start wondering, "Is it time to quit?" Is it them or is it you? Maybe it doesn’t even matter. If you find yourself increasingly dissatisfied at work, it might be time to make a change in your career. Time to Quit

Here are five signs it’s time to quit:

So you like your job, you feel that you are a very good employee, and you have been in the position for a while. Now you’re looking for the next opportunity – preferably upward. So how do you get a promotion to a new role? There are a lot of ways to skin a cat; you have to navigate the people and politics of your organization. But there are some steps you can take – and pitfalls to avoid – that are likely to get you noticed and move a rung up the ladder. tips to get promoted

Things you can do (and avoid) to get promoted:

You have a job but you feel you are stuck in a dead-end position. Or you fell into it and realize it isn’t your dream career. Or you are between jobs and finding it difficult to find something new. Is a career coach what you need to take your professional life to the next level? Possibly. What are the current challenges to finding your dream job? Are you open to advice from a stranger and trying new ideas? Do you have the resources (time and money) to invest in a professional consultant?

Here are some things to consider before hiring a career coach:

hiring a career coach

Interviews are stressful to almost everyone. You want to sound great, but not arrogant, accomplished but not overqualified, enthusiastic but not overeager. So what can you do? Well, you can practice with friends or family (maybe not colleagues if you don’t want your boss to find out), you can study your resume extensively so that you do not stumble over answers, and you can make sure you are prepared for tough but common interview questions (see our post on Five Hard Interview Questions and How to Answer Them for more on that). But here’s the not-so-great news. What you don’t say can also greatly influence how your interview goes. Sometimes your interviewer will consciously notice these unspoken things, sometimes it’s more subconscious, but it will dissuade them from moving forward. non-verbal interview tips

We offer these non-verbal interview tips to keep in mind:

Who are you? And what do you do? Are those two different questions or the same thing? Before we get too existential, the basic question is, do you feel that your current career really reflects the person you currently are, or the person you want to be? A couple of decades ago, this query seemed almost unimportant, even confusing. You get a job, get a couple of promotions, perhaps start to manage people, and that morphs into a career. No more. These days, it’s highly unusual to drift toward a job and then look over your shoulder and discover that is the definition of what you are. Why? Two reasons – one, the world is no longer that stable. In a climate of recessions and layoffs and wind-downs, it is not realistic to expect the same company that gave you your first chance out of college to be the same place to give you your retirement part. The average duration of any one job is now 4.4 years. Second, we as employees are no longer that static. We move to new locations, we go back to school. We get bored, we get curious. We pursue passions, we scratch an itch. The “second career” is actually the third or fourth. So how do you reinvent yourself?

Consider the following if you are looking to reinvent your resume:

starting a second career